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Quinn Hamilton


Developer/Entrepreneur

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Quinn Hamilton


Developer/Entrepreneur

 
 

My journey to becoming a developer began in 2012 with Year 29.

 

The Year 29 Project

In 2012, Karla Marshall, a good friend of my mine, embarked upon a project called Year 29. The purpose: invite the young women close to her to take a pause during that pivotal time --transitioning from our 20s to our 30s -- and evaluate how we feel, review what we had accomplished so far and then make whatever decisions were necessary to set up our 30s for greatness. As a 29 year old, I was making a competitive salary as a clinical research coordinator in cancer research at the University of Michigan. I loved assisting in the advancement of cancer research but I was unhappy with the day to day work of clinical research regulations. I knew I needed to make major changes in my career but was wary of throwing away nearly 7 years of clinical research experience and a comfortable living to try something new.

Enter the Year 29 project. My friend sat down with me and we talked about what I had achieved thus far, what I hoped to achieve in my 30s, and what steps I might take to get there. That conversation prompted me to do some serious soul-searching and decide my next steps in life. That year, right around my 29th birthday, I decided to leave the field of clinical research and attempt to find work in different fields -- education, non-profit (small and large), small business, etc. -- to test the waters and find the career path that made the most sense for me.

 

Becoming a Developer

To be completely honest, my life soon after making that decision was not easy. But in the span of 4 years, I secured part-time or full-time work in a small non-profit, a large community development-focused non-profit, and a small start-up. I also started my own business, Firebrand Candle Company. During that time, I saw many ups and downs but I learned more about myself in those 4 years than in my previous 29 years combined. Resilience. Character. Faith. Will. All of these were tested and ultimately strengthened. After 4 years of career experimentation, I was able to identify a few key themes. I loved being a leader and/or member of small teams working towards a common goal. I also loved the task of getting my business' online store up and running--which included a bit of coding. That's when I realized I'd been bitten by the coding bug.

The coding bug led me to participate in low-cost workshops focused on HTML/CSS, Wordpress, etc. through a local group called Girl Develop It. Building even the simplest things was challenging and tested my creativity but overall it made me feel accomplished...fulfilled. I was convinced that if I was ever able to, I would enroll in a coding bootcamp and completely change career paths for good. That opportunity came at the beginning of 2016 when I enrolled and completed the Grand Circus Java Bootcamp. I was hired by Asset Health, a web-based e-Learning and health management company, just a few weeks after graduating bootcamp and that is where I am employed as a software engineer today. After forging a path through unfamiliar territory, I found a career that I truly enjoy in a cool, growing industry. I am excited about continuing my journey.

 
 

Loves


Loves


Photography

What began as a practical project for my business (shoot more professional looking photos of my products) became a photography hobby of sorts. As a person who loves to learn new skills, DSLR photography has been quite the challenge but also incredibly rewarding.

Jax, aka Jackson Briggs

I won't bore you too much but I'm in love with bully breed dogs (American Pitbull Terriers, etc.). Here are a few photos of my bud, Jax, captured by Jason Walker during a recent photoshoot.